Seven Tragedies of Sophocles: Antigone

Seven Tragedies of Sophocles Antigone

Translated in verse by Robin Bond (2014) University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

Seven Tragedies of Sophocles : Antigone by Robin Bond (Trans) is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 InternationalLicense.

Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/10092/9681

Antigone

(Dramatis Personae) Antigone Ismene

Chorus of Theban Elders Creon

Guard Haimon Teiresias Messenger Eurydice

Second Messenger

Antigone

Dear sister, Ismene, my love and my life,

do you know of any ill that Zeus has not

inflicted on us in our brief lives, because of Oedipus?

For I have witnessed pain and madness, indeed,

and shame and dishonour yes, all of these

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have been a part of our fate and disaster.

And even now men speak of a new decree

the general has pronounced to all the city folk.

Have you heard of this, or you unaware of still

more hostile cruelty urged upon the ones we love?

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Ismene

No word has come to me, Antigone, about

our loved ones, neither fair nor foul, since we

were robbed of our dear brothers both,

in mutual slaughter on that dread and single day.

And since the Argive army left in the night

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just past, I have had no further news

to bring me either grief or happiness.

An.

Just as I thought and so I have called you here,

alone outside the gates to hear he news from me.

Is.

What then? You would uncover some dark threat?

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An.

Lord Creon has honoured only one of our

two brothers with a grave, dishonouring his twin.

Men say he has interred Eteocles beneath

the earth with all due rites and ceremony,

to rest in honour with the dead below,

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while poor dead Polyneices’ corpse, men say,

he has decreed to all the citizens that they

must neither give it burial, nor cries of grief,

but leave the corpse unburied and unwept,

to give a welcome larder to sharp-eyed birds.

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Such orders, men say, the noble Creon has also

enjoined on you and me, on me, I say, on me…

and now he is coming even here to announce

his news to those as yet in ignorance, a thing

of some importance too, since he will condemn

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all those who disobey to public stoning in the streets.

That is the situation, and you will soon reveal

if you are noble born, or will betray your line.

Is.

You always were impetuous… but if things are

as you say, what can I do to hinder him, or help?

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An.

Perhaps you can share an enterprise with me.

Is.

What enterprise? Just what is in your mind?

An.

Will you join hands with me to bury him.

Is.

You think to bury him, a thing forbidden to all?

An.

Yes! Bury my brother and yours, like it or not!

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For I shall not be blamed for betraying him!

Is.

Rash fool you are, when the king forbids!

An.

It is not his right to keep me from my own.

Is.

Oh, no! Consider our father, sister, how

he died, an object of hatred, all honour gone,

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a man who took it on himself, with his

own hands, to gouge, destroy his eyes;

and then his wife and mother, ours as well,

she throttled out her life in the woven noose;

and third and last, our brothers, on the self-

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same day, in rashness, both fulfilled their fate,

and brought about their deaths with mutual hands.

Consider again how we, the sole surviving kin,

how we shall both be ruined, yes, in misery, if we

run counter to the vote and power of a king.

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We must remember this  we are mere women both,

and so we cannot hope to combat men. And so,

since we are ruled by those who are more powerful,

we must obey them, and suffer even worse, if needs

must be. And so I shall beg of those beneath the earth

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to pardon me for what I am compelled to do,

and I shall obey the men who walk in power.

It makes no sense to flout due moderation here.

An.

I would not pressure you to work with me, not even if

you wanted to, and gladly changed your mind…

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Be just what you choose yourself to be, while I myself

shall bury him – and if I die, then well and good.

For I shall lie in love beside my best beloved, when I

have done this crime of piety: the time to please the dead

below is longer far than that required to satisfy the world above.

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For I shall rest there evermore… but you, so be your will,

be guilty of dishonouring the practice honoured by the gods!

Is.

I shall not be guilty of dishonouring the laws of god,

but I am not empowered to flout by force the people’s will.

An.

Excuses are easy to make – but I shall make my way

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and heap the earth on my dear brother’s tomb.

Is.

My dear misguided darling, how I fear for you…

An.

Fear not for me, guide rather your own course aright.

Is.

At least you must not advertise your plan to anybody else,

but keep it closely hid and I will also keep it so…

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An.

Proclaim it rather! Your silence will win my hatred more,

unless you broadcast, shout my crime aloud to all.

Is.

Your blood runs hot in the face of chilling threats.

An. I know I shall find most favour where most I ought.

Is. If you succeed perhaps, but what you strive for is impossible. 90

An. So then I’ll fail, but only when my strength fails me… Is. It is not right to hunt in vain in a hopeless quest… An. To say such things willearn my hate, and you

will be hated too, and justly, by our brother dead.

Allow me, please, to suffer the dread results 95

of foolishness… for at least I shall not suffer then the thing I hate the most, a shameful death.

Is. If that is your decision, go, but be assured of this, despite the folly of your quest, your loved ones love you still.

Chorus

Sunlight, fairer yet than all str.

the former days to shine 101

on seven-gated Thebes,

you have shone at last, bright eye of this golden day, have come

across the streams of Dirke, 105

have put to flight the men who came from Argos, white their shields, in total panoply,

and fled far swifter than they came.

This host it came against our land, 110

the reason  Polyneices’ fretful claim, and screaming shrill it stooped

upon our land, an eagle plumed on wings of snow, all white,

allied with full array of arms 115

and horse-haired helmet crests.

He stood outside our walls, ant. his a ring of spears agape

with bloodied teeth, a threat

to the sevenfold mouths 120

of Thebes… but he was gone before his jaws were glutted on our blood, or pine fed flame engulfed our crown of towers.

The clatter of war rose thick about him, 125

indomitable the dragon born battle cry.

For Zeus he loathes boasts made

by an arrogant tongue, and so when he saw them, a river in spate, and filled

with the clangour of gold-clad disdain,

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that man he hurled down with thunder and fire,

as he strove at the peak

of endeavour, advancing victory’s cry.

And he fell, hurled, twisting down to the earth, his torch clasped still in his hand, who had then in his madness breathed

str.

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hatred most bitter against us.

Dashed, disappointed

his hopes, and mighty Ares, god

of war, allotted each their different fate, rude help and harnessed strength.

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Seven captains, each marshalled to match matching champions, each at the sevenfold gates, abandoned their gear, all of bronze, a trophy

for Zeus, save for two, ill fated this pair, twins born

of one mother, one sire, spear shafts set against each the other’s they stood, to the fate

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of a mutual death both condemned.

And victory has come, fair of fame, to Thebes, a city that loves its wealth of chariots, and the wars

are all done and behind us now,

ant.

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so let us forget, and dance

through the night to the homes

of the gods in our dance, Dionysus our guide, as his feet beat the earth.

But here is the king of this land, lord Creon, the son of Menoeceus, new come to the throne, the most recent chance brought by the gods: what fresh plan does he urge that he comes, and has summoned this council of elders

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to meet in assembly,

brought by a common command.

Creon My friends, our ship of state, storm-tossed by the gods, has been set once more by them upon a safe and even keel;

and I have summoned you by messenger, from all the citizens

especially, to come, because I know, and well, that you 165

did ever honour loyally the rule of Laius in the house –

and so too after him, when Oedipus was ruler of the state… and when he… died… why still you remained a bastion

of common and supportive sense for their successive heirs.

When those two men did perish on the self same day, 170

struck down by a mutual fate and by each other’s hand, and they did share the guilt and shame of fratricide,

I then assumed the throne and all the cares of royal power by dint of my closest kinship with the brothers dead.

It is impossible to know and understand the heart 175

and soul and intellect of any man, until he is revealed, submitting to the daily test of government and rule.

For if a man, entrusted with the total guidance of the state, will take no heed of counsel from the best of men,

but keeps a lock upon his tongue through some anxiety, 180

why him I judge, have always judged the worst of men; and if any man considers that a friend weighs more in his affections than the state, why him I count as nothing worth. For I  Zeus be my witness, who forever sees all things 

would never hold my peace were I to see disaster speed 185

against the citizens so as to ruin our security, nor yet could I befriend a man, at any time, who posed a threat to the state, because I know and know it well that she, our city, is our bulwark and our strength, in whose

safe care we sail and prosper and find proper friends. 190

With principles like these I shall enhance our city’s fame. Accordingly, I have publicly pronounced my policy regarding these two brothers, the sons of Oedipus: Eteocles, who died a hero’s death, his spear in hand,

in defence of this city, a hero I say, he shall be buried 195

in a tomb, with all the offerings that are sent below to accompany the very best and noblest of the dead; but that man’s brother, yes, Polyneices I mean, who, though he was an exile, descended on

his native land and gods, intent on sack and fire 200

and pillage, intent on drinking kindred blood, on leading others of his kin in slavery, of him it is decreed that none shall gratify his corpse

with proper burial rites, nor yet lament for him,

but men must leave his body all exposed, a feast 205

for carrion birds and dogs, gross spectacle of shame. My mind is thus made up, and never shall the men of shame outstrip the just, so long as Ihold sway; whoever, though, has served this city well, alive

or dead, that man I shall both honour and respect.

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Ch.

Cr.

It is your pleasure then, Menoeceus’ son, to deal

in contrary fashion with the traitor and the patriot. Employ the law’s full force upon the dead, therefore, and on as many of us as yet do live. This is your right. You will, of course, ensure my will is done…

215

Ch.

Cr.

Ch.

Cr.

Ch.

That task were entrusted better to a younger man.

I have posted eager guards to oversee the corpse. What else then would you still enjoin on us?

You must not sympathise with those who may transgress. No man is quite so foolish that he wants to die.

220

Cr.

That would be the penalty, be sure… but oftentimes

a man has been corrupted by the hope of gain.

Guard

My lord, I shall not speak as one who has come,

quite out of breath from haste, nor as one fleet of foot, since many times my anxious and whirling thoughts

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delayed my progress here, and brought me to a stop.

For my inner voice would speak, and that at length, ‘You fool! You know what pay awaits you there!’ ‘You clown, yet more delay?’ ‘If Creon learns of this from someone else…then yours will be the sorry ass!’

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Such consternation checked my tardy progress here,

and so a meagre path becomes a marathon…

At last, however, my resolve to come to you, it won

the day…and I will tell my tale, such as it is, mere bagatelle… and anyway I guess one thing alone is certain sure,

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Cr.

I cannot suffer anything outside my share of destiny.

What is this tale that causes such distress?

Gu.

I want to tell you first my role in this – I didn’t have

one, actually, nor did see the man who did… do

this thing – and so by rights I shouldn’t pay the penalty…

240

Cr.

Gu.

You shrewdly aim to fence this thing around, blockade

yourself from blame… You clearly have a novel tale to tell. Yes, dangerous news will urge long-windedness upon a man…

Cr.

Gu.

Then spit it out and then be off with you!

I’m telling you… Someone just now has gone

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Cr.

and done a burial, has sprinkled thirsty dust

upon the flesh, performed the necessary rites… What’s that? What man would dare that crime?

Gu.

I do not know. For there was no mark of shovel there,

no clods dug up by a hoe. The earth was packed

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and barren dry, unbroken even by the ruts

of wagon wheels – the perpetrator left no trace.

And when the early morning watchman showed

us this, all felt a dreadful clutch of fear.

For the corpse had vanished, not buried fully yet –

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a scanty covering of dust sufficient to placate the dead.

No hint at all there was that predator or dogs

had come, no sign of any rending of the flesh.

Recriminations then flew thick and fast, with guard

accusing guard, until it would have come at last

260

to blows  and no one there to check the brawl.

For each and every one of us could have done this thing…

and yet there was no proof, and all denied their guilt.

Prepared we were to grasp hot iron in our hands, to walk

on fire and call the gods to witness we were innocent,

265

were not involved, knew nothing of the crime,

were not complicit in the planning or the act.

At length, when nothing further came from our

enquiries, a comment was made which had us all

in fear survey our boots. For we could think of no

270

reply nor plan of action that was not fraught

with peril. For it was said the crime should be

referred to you, that there should be no cover up.

This counsel won the day and the lot selected me,

poor foolish wretch that I am, to win this privilege.

275

So I am come against my will and yours, I know.

For no man likes to be the bearer of bad news.

Ch.

My lord, I have long been nurturing the thought

that this act may have been driven by the gods.

Cr.

Enough, before your words fill me with rage, and you

280

are found to be as senile as your age suggests,

since what you say cannot be borne, declaring that

the gods have any care about that wretched corpse.

Would they have buried him and honoured him

as if he were a gallant hero when he came in fact

285

to torch their colonnades and temples, overthrow

their images, lay waste their land, destroy their laws?

Can you conceive of the gods respecting evil men?

Not so! For from the first some citizens begrudged

my will and muttered secretly against me, shook

290

their heads, refused to bear in cheerfulness my yoke

and my dominion, as right and justice demand.

These are the men, I am convinced, that have bribed

the guards, and have suborned them into wickedness.

For nothing ever took root so evil among men

295

as pieces of silver. Cash brings destruction on the state,

drives men to betray their homes and their native land,

perverts the consciousness and turns the noble minds

of men so they can countenance all acts of shame.

Corruption teaches men the varied kinds of villainy,

300

highlights the potential sleaze in every enterprise.

But as many as have profited by this crime have but

ensured that they in time will pay due recompense.

And so – as still I hold lord Zeus in high regard 

be well assured – and hear my solemn oath on this, 

305

unless you find the guilty man who did this burial,

and then deliver him to me before my very eyes,

then death alone will not suffice for you, until,

hung out in torment, you inform upon this violation,

so you may learn in future whence to snatch your gain,

310

and also learn the lesson that you should not be blind

in your love affair with each and every source of coin.

For you will see that more men are destroyed

by ill-gotten gains than are made secure by them.

Gu.

You grant me leave to speak, or should I turn and go?

315

Cr.

You do not understand how tiresome is your talk?

Gu.

Do I tire your ears alone, or your thoughts as well?

Cr.

But why define the seat of irritation?

Gu.

The criminal pains your heart, I but your ears…

Cr.

Good gods, what a natural clown you are!

320

Gu.

Not such a clown as to have done this thing.

Cr.

On the contrary, and you sold your soul for cash!

Gu.

Ye gods!

It is terrible when the judge can get it wrong!

Cr.

Philosophise, so be your wish – but if you do not

produce for me the men who did this thing, you shall

325

aver that criminal gain brings sorrows in its wake.

Gu.

Why, I wish then he be found… but whether he

be caught or not – and fortune be the judge of that 

be sure you will not see me coming here again.

And now, beyond all hope and expectation safe,

330

I owe the gods a monster debt of gratitude.

Chorus

Many things dread and wonderful,

str.

none though more dread than mankind –

voyaging across the white sea’s waste,

he makes his way, storm tossed from the south,

335

closed in by overarching, tumbling waves

he sails the valleys between, and of the gods, oldest born, Mother Earth,

everlasting, unwearied he constantly turns, year in and out criss-crossing the plough,

340

working the mule and the land.

Light-hearted tribes of the birds, he ensnares, taking joy in the hunt, and the clans of wild beasts,

salt sea fish scoured from the deep,

ant.

345

trapped in the coils of the well woven nets,

masterful man…conquering too with his traps high country beasts, their delight the wild and the space, breaks in the wild mane of the horse

350

that submits to the yoke,

and the unflagging bull from the hills.

Speech too and thought swift

as the wind he devised and the impulse creative of statecraft he learned,

str.

356

houses to ward off the frost’s inhospitable

sharpness of sky, rain’s lancing shafts, an answer for every demand

that exists or may threaten him,

360

yet to come. Only grave death

admits no escape… Deadly diseases yield now to cure.

Wisdom he has beyond dreams of invention, now bringing him ill and now yet again to salvation, should he follow the law,

and honour sworn justice of gods: the city stands proud, but provides

ant. 366

370

no safe home for the rash,

fixed on a life of crime.

Let no such man share in my hearth, nor in my sentiments,

the man who acts so!

375

An omen sent by the gods!

How can it be? but how deny the certainty this is indeed the child Antigone?

Poor wretched child

of wretched Oedipus, 380

whatever does this mean? It cannot be

they lead you as a criminal, transgressing Creon’s law,

caught in an act of foolishness?

Gu.

Here is the girl that committed the crime -we caught

her in the act of burial. But Creon, where is he?

385

Ch.

He returns from the house to answer our need.

Cr.

What is it here that makes my entrance opportune?

Gu.

My lord, a man should never swear that he won’t do

a thing in case hindsight should make him out a liar, since

I swore I wouldn’t come back here in a hurry again,

390

by reason of the threats with which you pelted me;

but unexpected joys which come quite unforeseen

are likely to outstrip by far all other happiness,

and so I come, although I swore I never would,

and bring this girl who was found in the act

395

of tidying the tomb. No need this time to cast

the lots, but I seized this opportunity for myself.

And now, my lord, take her yourself and test

her, put her to the question, as you like  while I

shall rightly gain complete acquittal in this case.

400

Cr.

Just how and where did you apprehend this girl?

Gu.

She was in the act of burial, no more, no less!

Cr.

You are aware then of the import of your words?

Gu.

I saw her in the act of burying the corpse the which

you had forbidden I assume that’s plain and clear enough?

405

Cr.

How is it she was seen and captured in the act?

Gu.

Well, it was like this, you see… we went back

to our post, all mindful of your dreadful threats,

and swept away the shroud of dust which cloaked

the body, laying the clammy corpse completely bare.

410

We sat ourselves down upon a ridge, upwind,

to escape the stench that might assail us there,

and each kept the others alert with floods of abuse,

ensuring none grew careless in their task.

And that was how it was for quite a while until

415

the sun’s bright disk was at its zenith overhead

and the heat grew stifling and all at once a blast

of wind kicked up a dust storm from the ground,

a nuisance of a thing which filled the plain, tore leaves

and branches from the trees, and all the sky’s great dome

420

was choked with it, while we, eyes shut, endured

god’s plague, but when this storm at last abated,

the child was spotted there, who cried aloud a cry

as sharp in bitterness as that of any bird, as when

it sees the empty nest stripped bare of fledgling young;

425

and just so she on seeing the body there exposed

screamed cries of grief and imprecations dire

upon the men who had undone her work. At once

she lifted up the dust dry earth in her cupped hands

and lifted too a well shaped urn of bronze and crowned

430

the corpse three times with threefold offerings of drink.

And when we saw her there, we rushed her then

to hunt her down, but she did not seem at all upset.

We questioned her about her past and present crimes,

and there she stood, did not deny a single thing.

435

And so I am at once both happy and distressed…

To escape from danger oneself is very sweet indeed,

but to do so at the cost of driving a friend into harm

brings pain. All things, though, pale into insignificance,

I think, and naturally so, compared with one’s own reprieve.

440

Cr.

You there, yes you, with your head cast down to the ground,

do you confess, or deny that you have done these things.

An.

I do declare I did these things, do not deny the fact.

Cr.

Then you can take yourself off where you will,

absolved of any grievous charge or guilt.

445

You, though, answer me… and keep it brief.

Were you aware that had publicly forbidden such an act?

An.

I was aware of it, of course I was… You made it crystal clear.

Cr.

And still you dared to contravene these laws?

An.

I did, since Zeus had not pronounced these laws,

450

nor yet does Justice, dweller with the gods below,

prescribe such laws among the ranks of mortal men.

I did not think that your decrees were of such weight

that they could countermand the laws unfailing and

unwritten of the gods, and you a mortal only and a man.

455

The laws divine are not for the now, nor yet for yesterday,

but live forever and their origins are mysteries to men.

There was no way that I would wish to pay a penalty

to gods for contravening them, and all because I feared

a tyrant’s temper. I know that I must die of course 

460

quite irrespective of your will… and if, then, must die

before my time, I reckon that to my advantage  since who

would choose to live, all set about with troubles such as mine,

would not consider that to die would bring advantages?

And so the pain that might accrue for me in death

465

is but a trifle, although I would be hurt indeed were dogs

to savage and shame my dead sibling’s naked corpse,

my mother’s child… but as it is I feel no pain nor hurt.

And if by chance I seem to you to act in foolishness, it may

just be it is a fool himself condemns my foolishness.

470

Ch.

The child reveals her savage heart, itself a legacy

from Oedipus… and quite incapable of compromise.

Cr.

Know well that the most stubborn souls most often take

the hardest fall, and that you will most often see

the iron that is tempered hard and rigid in the flames,

475

will see that metal fragment and shatter and snap.

I also know that the highest spirited horse can be controlled

with the merest curb… nor is it ever possible for a man

to think proud thoughts when he is his neighbour’s slave.

This woman, though, has always known the way

480

of arrogance, just now did contravene established law

and still compounds, a second time, her crime of pride,

indulging herself in laughter and boasting her guilt.

And so I am myself no man, but rather she the man,

should she retain this seeming victory unchecked.

485

It matters not she is my sister’s child, closer to me by blood

than any of the folk who worship Zeus within my house,

since neither she nor yet her sister shall escape the worst

of fates for I charge that woman too with share,

an equal share in this conspiracy to bring about the burial!

490

So call her here! For I saw her just now in a passionate fit

of madness within, quite out of control of her wits.

The minds of those who contrive treason and plots

in the dark are like to betray themselves and so be caught.

I hate the man who when apprehended as a criminal

495

will choose to glorify and make a virtue of his crime.

An.

Do you wish to do more than merely kill your prisoner?

Cr.

No more than that, since that is all I need to do.

An.

Why then delay? This conversation brings me no

enjoyment, nor would ever any talk with you,

500

while talk with me brings no delight to you, I trust.

And yet what greater acclamation could I win,

but from the burial of my own brother’s corpse.

And all the people here would say this crime did please

them too, if only terror did not lock their silent lips.

505

Cr.

An.

Cr.

But the king is blessed with many fine advantages, not least of which is his capacity to speak and act just as he likes.

Alone of Cadmus’ folk you see the situation so… They see it also so, but fawn and cower down to you. Have you no shame to think to be apart from them?

510

An.

Cr.

An.

Cr.

An.

There is no shame in honouring one’s brothers so.

Your other brother too both fought against him and died? All siblings from the self-same sire and mother both… How honour then the one to slight the other man?

Eteocles would not bear witness thus against dead kin.

515

Cr.

An.

Cr.

An.

Cr.

He would were you to give the traitor equal rights.

This is not his slave’s, but a brother’s corpse and death… Who wished to rape this land, while he defended it.

But nonetheless lord Death desires these burial rites. The patriot demands a better share than the renegade…

520

An.

Cr.

An.

Cr.

Who knows if things are quite so clear in Hades’ house?

The enemy, the friend are separate, alive or dead. I am disposed to love by nature not to hate…

Then go beneath the earth to love your dead if love you must! So long as I live, no woman shall rule me.

525

Ch.

But see, before the gates, Ismene here,

your sister comes, shedding sisterly tears… and clouds of grief upon her fevered brow do shade her face

to drown her loveliness.

530

Cr.

You there, you, secret serpent, lurking in my house, you too have fed on me, all unawares, nor did I know I nurtured a twofold curse to rise rebellious against my throne – come, speak to me, confess! Did you share

this burial with her, or do you deny complicity on oath?

535

Is.

An.

Is.

I have done this thing, if only she accepts my claim,

and I would share the guilt and in the punishment.

I might, but right and justice never shall allow you this, since you refused to help, nor yet did I accept your help. But in your present storms of strife I feel no shame

540

An.

Is.

An.

myself to sail with you to share your suffering.

The dead and Hades too can witness whose deed this is! I have no love myself for those who love in word alone.

I beg you, sister, don’t dishonour me, forbidding me to share your death, but rather let me share in honouring the dead.

You shall not share my death, nor claim a share in deeds that were not yours my willing death shall satisfy the day.

545

Is.

An.

Is.

What life or love remains for me despoiled of you? Ask Creon that! Since all your care is all for him! What good does it do to hurt, to wound me so?

550

An.

Is.

An.

Is.

An.

The hurt was mine when forced to sneer at you.

What can I do to remedy that hurt?

Preserve your life I don’t begrudge you life. And shall I have no share at all in what is yours? You chose to live, I chose to die.

555

Is.

An.

Is.

An.

Cr.

Is.

Cr.

At least I had my say on that…

Some will approve your choice, still others mine. And yet our folly now is shared…

Have courage now… you are alive, my soul was long since dead, which fitted me to serve the dead.

It seems that of these girls the one has gone stark mad just now, the other though has been quite mad from birth. Our native common sense, my lord, cannot remain untouched by situations dire, must take its leave.

So much is sure for you, who chose to share her crime.

560

565

Is.

Cr.

Is.

Cr.

Is.

What life is left for me to live alone bereft of her.

Speak not of her – she is no more.

And shall you kill your own son’s bride to be? There are plenty of other fields for him to plough. But none to offer such a loving union…

570

Cr.

An.

Cr.

Ch.

Cr.

I do not desire my sons to marry wicked wives.

My Haemon, best beloved, your father does you wrong! You and your precious marriage, how they irk…

You shall deny your son his bride?

Death rather is the one to stop their union.

575

Ch.

Cr.

You have, it seems, decreed her death.

Both I and you… Waste no more time, you there, but take them both inside. Our women must

no more be left to wander out of doors… Brave men will even try to flee when close

580

upon their lives they see the march of death.